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Informative Articles

5 Steps To A Successful Resume
1. Choose Your Format Correctly - There are two main resume formats - chronological and functional. If you are seeking a job in a field in which you already have work experience, you will probably want to choose a chronological format where you will...

Effective Resume Writing
A lot of places around the world call it A Curriculum Vitae, in North America, it's a Résumé. This is definitely one of the most important tools that any jobseeker has at their disposal. You may be THE best candidate for a particular job by a long...

Facing Job Interview
Facing the job Interview It is a very tough job market now days. You have to have additional skills to be successful. A little careful study and practice will give an edge over the others and you will come out with flying colors. Here are some...

Information On Private Student Loans
Getting an education after high school is becoming more and more expensive. But it is also becoming more and more of a necessity to get a good job that pays well and has adequate benefits. For this, most young people need to attend college or some...

Job Search & Resume Tips
Finding a job has become much more of a challenge in recent years. Using the Internet as an additional resource will increase your options to find many great job opportunities, which are not always advertised in the newspaper. Many...

 
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Job Labor Laws

Before Young Jobs can help you become a member of the workforce, there are legal statutes that you must comply with. The Child Labor Laws listed below define restrictions placed on the age and employment of minors.

Child Labor Law: Job Restrictions

18 Years of Age

Once a youth reaches 18 years of age, he or she is no longer subject to the federal youth employment and child labor law provisions.

16 and 17 Years of Age

Sixteen- and 17-year-olds may be employed for unlimited hours in any occupation other than those declared hazardous by the Secretary of Labor. Examples of equipment declared hazardous in food service establishments include power-driven meat processing machines (meat slicers, saws, patty forming machines, grinders, or choppers), commercial mixers and certain power-driven bakery machines.

14 and 15 Years of Age

During the school year, hours are limited to 3 hours a day and 18 hours a week. On days when there's no school and in the summer, working hours increase to 8 hours a day and 40 hours a week. There are limits on when children can work, too - no later than 7 p.m. during the school year and no later than 9 p.m. between June 1 and Labor Day. Fourteen- and 15- year-olds may be employed in restaurants and quick-service establishments outside school hours in a variety of jobs for limited periods of time and under specified conditions.

Jobs Exempt from Child Labor Law Regulations

In general, children of any age are permitted to work for businesses entirely owned by their parents, except those under 16 may not be employed in mining or manufacturing and no one under 18 may be employed in any occupation the Secretary of Labor has declared to be hazardous.

Minors employed in the delivery of newspapers to consumers are exempt from Fair Labor Standards

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Act (FLSA) child labor provisions, as well as the wage and hours provisions.

Children employed as actors or performers in motion pictures or theatrical productions, or in radio or television productions are exempt from Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) coverage. Therefore, FLSA rules regarding total allowable number of work hours in one day and allowable times of day to work do not apply.

There are other exemptions, including making evergreen wreaths at home, so check the DOL Exemptions from Child Labor Law Rules for the full list.

Child Labor Regulation Changes

Effective in February, 2005, new child labor regulations expand protections for youth working in restaurant cooking, roofing, and driving, among other changes.

Youth Minimum Wage

The federal minimum wage is $5.15 per hour. However, a special minimum wage of $4.25 per hour applies to employees under the age of 20 during their first 90 consecutive calendar days of employment with an employer. After 90 days, the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) requires employers to pay the full federal minimum wage. However, certain states may differ from state to federal minimum wage. Click here to view your states regulations.

Working Papers (Employment/Age Certificates)

In some states, workers under eighteen, may need to obtain working papers (officially called Employment/Age Certificates) in order to legally be able to work. The form may be available at at school. Otherwise, child workers can get one at the state Department of Labor. Check the Employment/Age Certification list to see which guidelines apply to you. If it's school, check with your Guidance Office. If it's the Department of Labor, check with your state office.

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About the Author

CEO Young Jobs Inc.